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Balancing needs: The role of motivations, meanings and relationship dynamics in the experience of informal caregivers of people with dementia

Quinn, C. and Clare, L. and Woods, R.T. (2013) Balancing needs: The role of motivations, meanings and relationship dynamics in the experience of informal caregivers of people with dementia. Dementia, 14 (2). pp. 220-237. DOI: 10.1177/1471301213495863

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Abstract

This paper investigates how meaning, motivation and relationship dynamics influence the caregivers� subjective experience of caregiving. We interviewed 12 family caregivers of relatives with dementia. We analysed transcripts of these interviews using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Six key themes emerged from the analysis, which were encompassed under an overarching theme of �balancing needs�. This describes the caregivers� constant struggle to balance their own needs against those of their relative, which created a series of dilemmas. These dilemmas emerged from the desire to try to preserve the caregivers� relationship with their relative, while recognising that this relationship was changing. The caregivers� relationship with their relative influenced the caregivers� motivations to provide care and gave caregiving meaning. Although caregivers were motivated to provide care the battle to balance needs meant that the caregivers recognised there might come a time when they may need to cease caregiving.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > Institute of Medical & Social Care Research
College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Psychology
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 16:41
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2015 03:05
ISSN: 1471-3012
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/775
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1177/1471301213495863
Publisher: Sage Publications
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