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Post-exercise hot water immersion induces heat acclimation and improves endurance exercise performance in the heat

Zuralew, M.J. and Walsh, N.P. and Fortes, B. and Potter, C. (2015) Post-exercise hot water immersion induces heat acclimation and improves endurance exercise performance in the heat. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. DOI: 10.1111/sms.12638

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Abstract

We examined whether daily hot water immersion (HWI) after exercise in temperate conditions induces heat acclimation and improves endurance performance in temperate and hot conditions. Seventeen non-heat-acclimatized males performed a 6-day intervention involving a daily treadmill run for 40 min at 65% V�O2max in temperate conditions (18 °C) followed immediately by either HWI (N = 10; 40 °C) or thermoneutral (CON, N = 7; 34 °C) immersion for 40 min. Before and after the 6-day intervention, participants performed a treadmill run for 40 min at 65% V�O2max followed by a 5-km treadmill time trial (TT) in temperate (18 °C, 40% humidity) and hot (33 °C, 40% humidity) conditions. HWI induced heat acclimation demonstrated by lower resting rectal temperature (Tre, mean, �0.27 °C, P < 0.01), and final Tre during submaximal exercise in 18 °C (�0.28 °C, P < 0.01) and 33 °C (�0.36 °C, P < 0.01). Skin temperature, Tre at sweating onset and RPE were lower during submaximal exercise in 18 °C and 33 °C after 6 days in HWI (P < 0.05). Physiological strain and thermal sensation were also lower during submaximal exercise in 33 °C after 6 days in HWI (P < 0.05). HWI improved TT performance in 33 °C (4.9%, P < 0.01) but not in 18 °C. Thermoregulatory measures and performance did not change in CON. Hot water immersion after exercise on 6 days presents a simple, practical, and effective heat acclimation strategy to improve endurance performance in the heat.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 23 Dec 2015 03:48
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2016 03:24
ISSN: 0905-7188
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/6033
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1111/sms.12638
Publisher: John Wiley and Sons
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