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Objective function, lean mass and associated genetic adaptations of the operated leg following total hip arthroplasty

Okoro, T. and Stewart, C. and Al-Shanti, N. and Lemmey, A.B. and Maddison, P.J. and Andrew, J.G. (2015) Objective function, lean mass and associated genetic adaptations of the operated leg following total hip arthroplasty. Journal of Musculoskeletal Research, 18 (2). DOI: 10.1142/S0218957715500074

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Abstract

Purpose: To characterize muscle recovery following total hip arthroplasty (THA) combining genetic adaptations in the affected leg with objective function and body composition assessment. Methods: Preoperatively and at six weeks postoperatively, objective function was assessed by: maximal voluntary contraction of the operated leg quadriceps (MVCOLQ) in Newtons (N), 30 s chair sit-to-stand (ST), and six-minute walk test (6MWT), with lean mass of the operated leg estimated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Genetic adaptations were assessed from vastus lateralis (VL) biopsies by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis of markers of hypertrophy (FOS, calpain2 (CAPN2)), atrophy (20 s proteasome alpha subunit 7 (PSMA7), cathepsin L2 (CTSL2), inflammation (Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-6 (IL-6)) and lipid metabolism (lipoprotein lipase, LPL and peroxisome proliferated activated receptor gamma (PPARAG). Results: 14 patients were recruited. At six weeks, no significant differences, relative to preoperative values, were noted in either objective function or leg lean mass. Markers for hypertrophy were increased (FOS +1463%, p = 0.016), with atrophy (PSMA7 -44.8%, p = 0.016; CTSL2 -42.5%, p = 0.050), inflammation (TNF -29.6%, p = 0.023) and lipid metabolism markers showing a decreasing trend (LPL -42.45%, p = 0.016). Conclusion: The initial post-THA intramuscular environment appears supportive of anabolism. However, this is not reflected in objective function or lean mass measures at six weeks, suggesting longer duration may be required for physiological adaptation to occur.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Medical Sciences
College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2015 03:28
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2015 03:28
ISSN: 0218-9577
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/5881
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1142/S0218957715500074
Publisher: World Scientific
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