eBangor

Can creatine supplementation improve body composition and objective physical function in rheumatoid arthritis patients? A randomised controlled trial

Wilkinson, T.J. and Lemmey, A.B. and Jones, J.G. and Sheikh, F. and Ahmad, F.S. and Ahmad, Y.A. and Chitale, S. and Maddison, P.J. and O'Brien, T.D. (2015) Can creatine supplementation improve body composition and objective physical function in rheumatoid arthritis patients? A randomised controlled trial. Arthritis Care & Research. DOI: 10.1002/acr.22747 (In Press)

[img]
Preview
Text
34231.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (629kB) | Preview

Abstract

Rheumatoid cachexia (muscle wasting) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients contributes to substantial reductions in strength and impaired physical function. The objective of this randomised control trial was to investigate the effectiveness of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation in increasing lean mass and improving strength and physical function in RA patients. Method. In a double-blind design, 40 RA patients, were randomised to either 12 weeks supplementation of Cr or placebo. Body composition (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, DXA, and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy, BIS), strength and objectively-assessed physical function were measured at: baseline, day 6, week 12 and week 24. Data analysis was performed by ANCOVA. Results. Creatine supplementation increased appendicular lean mass (ALM; a surrogate measure of muscle mass) by 0.52 (± 0.13) kg (P = 0.004 versus placebo), and total LM by 0.60 (± 0.37) kg (P = 0.158). The change in LM concurred with the gain in intracellular water (0.64�±�0.22 L, P = 0.035) measured by BIS. Despite increasing ALM, Cr supplementation, relative to placebo, failed to improve isometric knee extensor (P = 0.408), handgrip strength (P = 0.833), or objectively-assessed physical function (P's = 0.335 � 0.764). Conclusion. In patients with RA, creatine supplementation increased muscle mass, but not strength or objective physical function. No treatment-related adverse effects were reported suggesting that Cr supplementation may offer a safe and acceptable adjunct treatment for attenuating muscle loss; this treatment may be beneficial for patients suffering from severe rheumatoid cachexia

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2015 03:28
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2016 02:33
ISSN: 2151-4658
Publisher's Statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: "Can creatine supplementation improve body composition and objective physical function in rheumatoid arthritis patients? A randomised controlled trial", which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.22747. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/5875
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1002/acr.22747
Publisher: Wiley
Administer Item Administer Item

eBangor is powered by EPrints 3 which is developed by the School of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. More information and software credits.