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The metabolic, hormonal, biochemical, and neuromuscular function responses to a backward sled drag training session.

West, D.J. and Cunningham, D.J. and Finn, C.V. and Scott, P.M. and Crewther, B.T. and Cook, C.J. and Kilduff, L.P. (2014) The metabolic, hormonal, biochemical, and neuromuscular function responses to a backward sled drag training session. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28 ((1)). pp. 265-272. DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182948110.

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Abstract

We examined the metabolic, hormonal, biochemical, and neuromuscular function (NMF) responses to a backward sled drag training session (STS) in strength-trained men (n = 11). After baseline collection of saliva (testosterone and cortisol), whole blood (lactate and creatine kinase [CK]), and countermovement jumps (peak power output), participants completed 5 sets of 2 � 20-m (30 second-recovery between drags and 120 second-recovery between sets) maximal backward sled drags (loaded with 75% body mass). Participants were retested immediately, 15 minutes, 1, 3, and 24 hours after STS. Peak power output decreased after STS (baseline, 4,445 ± 705 vs. 0 minute, 3,464 ± 819 W; p = 0.001) and remained below baseline until recovering at both the 3- and 24-hour time points. No changes in CK levels were seen at any time point after STS. Blood lactate increased immediately after STS (baseline, 1.7 ± 0.5 vs. 0 minute, 12.4 ± 2.6 mmol·L-1; p = 0.001) and remained elevated at 60 minutes (3.8 ± 1.9 mmol·L-1; p = 0.004) before returning to baseline at 3 and 24 hours. Testosterone peaked at 15 minutes post (baseline, 158 ± 45 vs. 15 minutes, 217 ± 49 pg·ml-1; p < 0.001) before decreasing below baseline at the 3-hour time point (119 ± 34 pg·ml-1; p = 0.008), but then increased again above baseline at 24 hours (187 ± 56 pg·ml-1; p = 0.04). Cortisol tended to increase at 15 minutes (baseline, 3.4 ± 1.8 vs. 15 minutes, 5.2 ± 2.7 ng·ml-1; p = 0.07) before declining below baseline at 3 hours (1.64 ± 0.93 ng·ml-1; p = 0.012) and returning to baseline concentrations at 24 hours. In conclusion, sled dragging provides an effective metabolic stimulus, with NMF restored after �3 hours of recovery. Characterizing the recovery time course after sled training may aid in athlete training program design.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 16:36
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2015 03:01
ISSN: 1064-8011
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/528
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182948110.
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