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Electric-field-induced band bending on GaN: in situ effects of electron beam irradiation on time-dependent cathodoluminescence

Campo, E.M. and Pophristic, M. and Hopkins, L. and Ferguson, I.T. (2015) Electric-field-induced band bending on GaN: in situ effects of electron beam irradiation on time-dependent cathodoluminescence. Applied Optics, 54 (12). pp. 3613-3623. DOI: 10.1364/AO.54.003613

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Abstract

Electron beam bombardment of GaN has been monitored by secondary electron (SE), cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging, simultaneous in situ CL, and specimen current (SC) measurements. Under extreme irradiation conditions, system perturbations, as seen by SE and time-dependent CL, are attributed to internal charge dynamics extending beyond the scanned areas. Under moderate irradiation conditions, the size of affected regions correlates with nominal scanned regions. Time-dependent CL at the near band edge (NBE) revealed complex interplay with SC, which was modeled through band bending at the Au/GaN interface. The system has shown distinctive internal electric field dynamics upon sample handling, affecting both time-dependent CL spectra and SC as well as producing contrast reversal in SE imaging, to which humidity adsorption could be contributing. The band-bending model presented here can account for both moderate irradiation and humidity effects through variations of depletion widths and Schottky barrier heights. Our findings are consistent with current models where e-beam activated VGa promotes decreased NBE intensities and CN promotes DL emissions.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Physical and Applied Sciences > School of Electronic Engineering
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2015 02:35
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2015 02:47
ISSN: 1559-128X
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/4685
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1364/AO.54.003613
Publisher: Optical Society of America
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