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Metabolic molecular markers of the tidal clock in the marine crustacean Eurydice pulchra

O'Neill, J.S. and Lee, K.D. and Zhang, L. and Feeney, K. and Webster, S.G. and Blades, M.J. and Kyriacou, C.P. and Hastings, M.H. and Wilcockson, D.C. (2015) Metabolic molecular markers of the tidal clock in the marine crustacean Eurydice pulchra. Current Biology. R326-R327. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.02.052

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Abstract

In contrast to the well mapped molecular orchestration of circadian timekeeping in terrestrial organisms, the mechanisms that direct tidal and lunar rhythms in marine species are entirely unknown. Using a combination of biochemical and molecular approaches we have identified a series of metabolic markers of the tidal clock of the intertidal isopod Eurydice pulchra. Specifically, we show that the overoxidation of peroxiredoxin (PRX), a conserved marker of circadian timekeeping in terrestrial eukaryotes [1], follows a circatidal (approximately 12.4 hours) pattern in E. pulchra, in register with the tidal pattern of swimming. In parallel, we show that mitochondrially encoded genes are expressed with a circatidal rhythm. Together, these findings demonstrate that PRX overoxidation rhythms are not intrinsically circadian; rather they appear to resonate with the dominant metabolic cycle of an organism, regardless of its frequency. Moreover, they provide the first molecular leads for dissecting the tidal clockwork.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Natural Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2015 02:35
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2015 02:47
ISSN: 0960-9822
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/4684
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.02.052
Publisher: Elsevier
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