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Neuromuscular, physiological and endocrine responses to a maximal speed training session in elite games players

Johnston, M. and Cook, C.J. and Crewther, B.T. and Drake, D. and Kilduff, L.P. (2015) Neuromuscular, physiological and endocrine responses to a maximal speed training session in elite games players. European Journal of Sport Science, 15 (6). pp. 550-556. DOI: 10.1080/17461391.2015.1010107

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the acute neuromuscular, biochemical and endocrine responses to a maximal speed training (MST) session. Eighteen male rugby players completed the protocol, which involved performing six maximal effort repetitions of 50 m running sprints with 5 minutes recovery between each sprint. Testosterone (T), cortisol (C), creatine kinase (CK), lactate (La), perceived muscle soreness (MS) and counter movement jump were collected immediately pre (PRE), immediately post (IP), 2 hours post (2P) and 24 hours post (24P) the sprint session. A bimodal recovery pattern was observed from the jump parameters with several declining significantly (p � 0.05) IP, recovering 2P and suffering a secondary decline 24P. CK and perceived MS were elevated IP and continued to rise throughout the protocol, while La was only elevated IP. T and C were unaffected IP but showed significant declines 2P. These data indicate that MST results in a bimodal recovery pattern of neuromuscular function with changes most likely being related to metabolic and biochemical responses.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2015 03:33
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2015 03:41
ISSN: 1746-1391
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/3530
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1080/17461391.2015.1010107
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
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