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Adverse childhood experiences: retrospective study to determine their impact on adult health behaviours and health outcomes in a UK population.

Bellis, M.A. and Lowey, H. and Leckenby, N. and Hughes, K. and Harrison, D. (2013) Adverse childhood experiences: retrospective study to determine their impact on adult health behaviours and health outcomes in a UK population. Journal of Public Health, 36 (1). pp. 81-91. DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdt038

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Abstract

Background Studies suggest strong links between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor adult health and social outcomes. However, the use of such studies in non-US populations is relatively scarce. Methods Retrospective cross-sectional survey of 1500 residents and 67 substance users aged 18�70 years in a relatively deprived and ethnically diverse UK population. Results Increasing ACEs were strongly related to adverse behavioural, health and social outcomes. Compared with those with 0 ACEs, individuals with 4+ ACEs had adjusted odds ratios of the following: 3.96 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.74�5.73] for smoking; 3.72 (95% CI: 2.37�5.85) for heavy drinking; 8.83 (95% CI: 4.42�17.62) for incarceration and 3.02 (95% CI: 1.38�6.62) for morbid obesity. They also had greater risk of poor educational and employment outcomes; low mental wellbeing and life satisfaction; recent violence involvement; recent inpatient hospital care and chronic health conditions. Higher ACEs were also associated with having caused/been unintentionally pregnant aged <18 years and having been born to a mother aged <20 years. Conclusions ACEs contribute to poor life-course health and social outcomes in a UK population. That ACEs are linked to involvement in violence, early unplanned pregnancy, incarceration, and unemployment suggests a cyclic effect where those with higher ACE counts have higher risks of exposing their own children to ACEs.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > Institute of Medical & Social Care Research
Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2015 03:39
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2016 03:15
ISSN: 1741-3842
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/3381
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdt038
Publisher: Oxford University Press
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