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Beyond sensation seeking: affect regulation as a framework for predicting risk-taking behaviors in high-risk sport.

Castanier, C. and Le Scanff, C. and Woodman, T. (2010) Beyond sensation seeking: affect regulation as a framework for predicting risk-taking behaviors in high-risk sport. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 32 (5). pp. 731-738. DOI: doi:

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Abstract

Sensation seeking has been widely studied when investigating individual differences in the propensity for taking risks. However, risk taking can serve many different goals beyond the simple management of physiological arousal. The present study is an investigation of affect self-regulation as a predictor of risk-taking behaviors in high-risk sport. Risk-taking behaviors, negative affectivity, escape self-awareness strategy, and sensation seeking data were obtained from 265 high-risk sportsmen. Moderated hierarchical regression analysis revealed significant main and interaction effects of negative affectivity and escape self-awareness strategy in predicting risk-taking behaviors: high-risk sportsmen�s negative affectivity leads them to adopt risk-taking behaviors only if they also use escape self-awareness strategy. Furthermore, the affective model remained significant when controlling for sensation seeking. The present study contributes to an in-depth understanding of risk taking in high-risk sport.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Health and Behavioural Sciences > School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 17:12
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2016 03:15
ISSN: 0895-2779
Publisher's Statement: As accepted for publication
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/2404
Identification Number: DOI: doi:
Publisher: Human Kinetics
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