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Critical human resource development: enabling alternative subject positions within a master of arts in human resource development educational programme

Lawless, A. and Sambrook, S. and Stewart, J. (2012) Critical human resource development: enabling alternative subject positions within a master of arts in human resource development educational programme. Human Resource Devlopment International, 15 ((3)). pp. 321-336. DOI: 10.1080/13678868.2012.689214

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Abstract

We examine how students made sense of the learning that occurred within a curriculum that challenged �traditional� human resource development (HRD), a curriculum informed by critical content and critical process. We draw attention to the identity work undertaken by students who were introduced to critical HRD and examine how this discourse enabled alternative �subject positions�. Drawing on an ethnographic research study informed by a discourse perspective on learning and identity, we explore how students reflected and made sense of their learning and identify eight subject positions: academic practitioner, frustrated practitioner researcher, deep thinking performer, politically aware and active, powerful boundary worker, personally empowered, emancipatory practitioner and personally empowered but disengaged. Drawing on these findings, we question whether the introduction of critical approaches to HRD afforded or prevented articulation and interchange between this educational programme and the students' employing organizations, highlighting the implications for HRD research and practice.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Research Publications
Departments: College of Business, Law, Education and Social Sciences > Bangor Business School
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2014 16:51
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2015 03:13
ISSN: 1367-8868
URI: http://e.bangor.ac.uk/id/eprint/1295
Identification Number: DOI: 10.1080/13678868.2012.689214
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
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